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zymish

Stuttering

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As a child, I had a huge stuttering problem. It's lessened quite a bit now, but it's still there. I don't so much get stuck on consonants as I do syllables or words, very occasionally a couple of words at a time. Only if they're short, though.

I find that if I speak more slowly, it's not as difficult, and that it happens more often when I'm in some state of excitement, be it fear, joy, anger, surprise, or whatever. I'm pretty sure this is common amongst stutterers. Part of the problem for me is that I have great difficulty in translating my thoughts into words on short notice. I'm very articulate and well-spoken when I have the time to be that way, but when I don't, I get flustered and can't think of the next word. I think my stuttering is like the everyman's "um", "uh", or "like". It doesn't help that I tend to think almost entirely without words. I think much faster without them and I don't like them getting in the way of my flexibility of thought.

Do any of you stutter, or know someone who does? Is it related to Asperger's, or is it a stand-alone trait?


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I stutter. I, like you, often think without words too. I think that it might be a trait of Asperger's because I have questioned many people about *how* they think. For me, I do often find it hard to translate thought substance into comprehensible words because my thoughts move exponentially faster than I can speak. 

I think I'll post a thread in which to discuss how people think, IE words, pictures, indescribable thought substance.


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I developed a slight stutter when I moved up to secondary school and it went after a while but came back last year, probably because of the social anxiety and depression I was having at the time. It comes and goes now but only when I get nervous or stressed about something.


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I tend to be more of a visual thinker as well. There is always a sort of translation period for me whenever someone speaks to me, or if I have to share thoughts, which leads to issues remembering and understanding directions. I do have bad auditory processing though, hard to say what is doing what... 

Stuttering isn't a constant issue with me, but it has and still does happen. Usually, its when I get upset/nervous about something. Like, if pressed for information, I might have a hard time getting it out if you are pressuring me. Can't get my thought together to share them in cases like that and it can result in stuttering or complete tongue lock.


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I've recently started a video blog, and it seems that "that" is the word I get stuck on most often, for some reason. I'll have to look into this a bit more.

Do any of you have video blogs? I find that once I get beyond the initial awkwardness of talking to no one, it's actually kind of fun. I can just articulate whatever's coming through my mind without having my train of thought interrupted, and there's no pressure to get the thoughts out quickly or anything like that. I recommend it, even if you don't intend to post it to the internet. It's good for examining my own behaviour.


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I don't think it's actually related to Asperger's. My ex-step-dad used to stutter A LOT, more than anyone I've come across before & he didn't have an ASD. I tend to stutter when I'm nervous, speaking too fast, or confused, etc. Luckily, it's never been too bad & is now much better than it used to be but it still happens sometimes.


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